Escape from Amsterdam to Utrecht: Centraal museum

To start with: my Favourite of this day is Hendrick ten Brugghen

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Yesterday (15-2-2019) opened in the Centraal Museum in Utrecht the exhibition Act II, 12 portraits by artist Joyce Vlaming.

From the museumwebsite: ‘Joyce Vlaming began her project in 2011: carefully portrayin the black ‘extra’s sometimes seen on historical 17the and 18th-century paintings. these boys (sometimes gilrs) are pictured on portraits of the Dutch upper class, in an era where slavery was taken for granted (by the majority of the Europeans ES). It has long been assumed that these background figures were fictional, but research shows that many of these people actually existed.

For this exhibition, Vlaming selected twelve paintings from various private museum collections in the Netherlands, including the Centraal Museum collection. Using photographic techniques she inverted the foreground and background figures, which gives the viewer a very different perspective on the painting. She has also attempted to find as much information as possible about the people portrayed. In this way, twelve anonymous people have their history restored, to some extent.’

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The exhibition is part of another exhibition Moed (Courage): What is left unseen

A broader perspective on Centraal Museum’s collection

Website: ‘In recent years, diversity and exclusion have become major topics of research and debate in the world of museums and of culture more generally. How can museums reflect on processes of exclusion and inclusion by revisiting their collections, modes of display and curatorial language? How can the museum be a place open to a multiplicity of publics? And what exactly does diversity entail, and how can we translate this into policy and practice? What does equality look like, for whom and why? And what does difference look like, for whom and why?’ On display:  f.i. work by Iris Kensmil, by Steve Mcqueen and by Nola Hatterman.

 

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Also seen in this same museum the blockbuster exhibition:

Utrecht, Caravaggio and Europe.

With the exception of one, all the paintings in this exhibition were created between 1600-1630, which is the core period of the Caravaggist movement.

A review in pictures:

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After this Blockbuster visit, I  wandered through the museum in search of surprises and old acquaintances.

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See for Joyce Vlaming: https://www.centraalmuseum.nl/en/exhibitions/joyce-vlaming

See for the Caravaggist ; https://www.centraalmuseum.nl/en/exhibitions/utrecht-caravaggio-and-europe

See for Moed: https://www.centraalmuseum.nl/en/exhibitions/moed-what-is-left-unseen

All photos on this site are not intended for any commercial purpose. I have tried to trace all the rules and rights of all images. As far as I know, these images can be used in this way. If you ar a copyright holder and would like a piece of your work removed or the creditline changed then please do not hesitate to contact me.

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